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The Best New Fiction Out This April

by  | April 4
The-Best-New-Fiction-April

April may bring showers—but it also brings a lot of books, including these ten new reads that we are totally excited for! From a new entry in the Cassie Clare Shadowhunters universe and a biting coming-of-age story about a young millennial New Yorker, to a sweet story about Southern love and a sexy (dare we say dirty?) vampire romance from J. R. Ward, there is something for all of you book nerds in this month’s roundup.

Get reading, and as always, hit us up on the social media to tell us what you’re loving: Facebook (@GetLiterary)Twitter (@get_literary), and Instagram (@get.lit.erary)!

Photo by Yuri Efremov on Unsplash

The Red Scrolls of Magic

The Red Scrolls of Magic

by Cassandra Clare

Emily’s Pick

All Magnus Bane wanted was a vacation—a lavish trip across Europe with Alec Lightwood, the Shadowhunter who, against all odds, is finally his boyfriend. But as soon as the pair settles in Paris, an old friend arrives with news about a demon-worshipping cult called the Crimson Hand that is bent on causing chaos around the world. A cult that was apparently founded by Magnus himself. Years ago. As a joke. Nothing says love like chasing down a cult! You don’t want to miss Magnus and Alec’s new adventures in The Red Scrolls of Magic.

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The Astral Traveler's Daughter

The Astral Traveler's Daughter

by K.C. Archer

Elizabeth’s Pick #1

I can’t wait for the follow-up to School for Psychics by K. C. Archer, a.k.a. the series hailed as “Harry Potter with a cast of millennials” (Kirkus Reviews)! Rather than cloaks and wands, this school—secret government facility Whitfield Institute, to be exact—teaches students telepathy, telekinesis, and investigative tactics so that they can become psychic agents protecting the U.S. Book 1 followed Teddy, our ne’er-do-well heroine, as she discovered the truth of her abilities, and a colorful cast of fellow students as they tried (and often failed) to master their secret talents. I’m hoping Book 2, The Astral Traveler’s Daughter, will find Teddy putting her skills to the test!

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The Ash Family

The Ash Family

by Molly Dektar

Elizabeth’s Pick #2

I’m so excited for The Ash Family to hit shelves (on April 9)! It’s a debut that’s an intersection of everything I love in a novel: female narrators struggling to figure out their identity and place in the world, luscious writing about nature and even food (cheese-making! bread! homemade jam!), and cults! Okay, it’s more of an off-the-grid community devoted to an enigmatic leader, and they have a passion for living in an environmentally beneficial way, but if you loved The Incendiaries by R. O. Kwon, The Girls by Emma Cline, or Lauren Groff’s novel Arcadia, or even watching Wild Wild Country, then this will be totally up your alley. I can’t wait for more readers to dive in!

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Stay Up with Hugo Best

Stay Up with Hugo Best

by Erin Somers

Leora’s Pick

People. Read this book. Look, when I started reading Stay Up with Hugo Best, I was in one of those reading funks that makes you think you will never like a book again and you have to change your whole identity because who are you if you aren’t a reader. But then, both metaphorically and literally (I was on a plane), the clouds lifted. I couldn’t stop reading until I finished it, about twenty minutes into work the next morning. It’s incredibly rare that I can’t put down a book once I get to work—the hustle and the bustle of missed phone calls, urgent emails, and orders usually gets me out of reading mode. But this time around, something about this book made all of those things melt away. And, honestly, that’s the appeal of this book. It doesn’t shy away from the politics of the subject matter—the #metoo-esque environment, the inability to deal with or even understand the present-day government, the role of men (usually straight and white) in the changing entertainment industry—but Erin Somers somehow makes those aspects no more than background noise until she needs them to come to prominence. In the meantime, this book is fun, funny, and authentic to the experience of almost everyone—from aspiring millennials, hoping to make something special out of a relatively tame existence, to the aging man, desperately trying to avoid becoming a footnote in the history of “problematic men,” or worse, simply irrelevant. It’s almost rom-com-like in its ability to speak truth without weighting the reader down, but at the end of the book, you’re still left with a sense of heft, because you too have experienced the downfall of this straight, white man, but this time, he was too close to your heart to allow you to revel in it. Since reading it months and months ago, I have found that this book has only become more important and relevant. With our culture exposing more and more people who have created much of our cultural history, the question of how to separate art from artist is ever-present. Erin’s answer is clear and truly insightful: it’s not about the artist, it’s not about the art, it’s about the men who comment on a culture that inevitably tames them, destroys them, and changes them. And about this one woman who takes up the mantle to do the exact same thing, hoping for different results.

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The Invited

The Invited

by Jennifer McMahon

Sara’s Pick 

Have you ever picked up a book and been hooked on its author ever since? When a copy of The Winter People came into my possession, I thought it sounded like a fun, spooky read. I devoured it in two days, and have been a Jennifer McMahon fan ever since. But even if you've never come across her work, the description of The Invited makes this book too tempting to turn away: "The story of a husband and wife who don't simply move into a haunted house, they start building one from scratch, without knowing it, until it's too late." A story of homes, history, and potential homicide, this book is sure to send chills down your spine, even as the weather is warming up.

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The Savior

The Savior

by J.R. Ward

Abby’s Pick #1

Attention, paranormal romance readers! If you’re a fan of the Black Dagger Brotherhood, then you probably already have your calendar marked for this one—it’s not just that it’s the next in J. R. Ward’s bestselling series, but that people have been waiting for this book’s hero for years! Please welcome…MURHDER. (And to the uninitiated, no, that’s not a typo.) He was once part of the Brotherhood, but had to be exiled after he went mad for…reasons. Involving love. And death. Like you do. But now he’s back, and his quest for redemption leads him to a beautiful biomedical researcher trying to expose a lab that’s torturing its experimental victims. Warm and snuggly ain’t J. R. Ward’s style, but if you like your sexy intrigue dialed up to 11, pick this one up!

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Gimme Some Sugar

Gimme Some Sugar

by Molly Harper

Abby’s Pick #2

The love story at the heart of this book is as delicious as the cake on its cover! Molly Harper is a perfect Southern love and laughter author, and she’s created an entire world in fictional Lake Sackett, Georgia, a sleepy resort town grounded by the McCready clan (of McCready’s Funeral Home and Bait Shop, of course). In this book, Duffy McCready encounters the girl who got away—his childhood best friend, Lucy, who’s come back to town to open a bakery. Will he finally get his second chance at love? Or is it too little, too late? Although you can enjoy the sixth in Harper’s Southern Eclectic series without having read the previous books, why deprive yourself? Cut a slice of your favorite dessert and curl up with this series. You won’t regret it! Check out Sweet Tea and Sympathy, the first book in the series, in “Fly South for the Winter with These 4 Books.”

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The Favorite Sister

The Favorite Sister

by Jessica Knoll

Hannah’s Pick

When I started The Favorite Sister (now out in travel-friendly paperback) I was ready for the drama that would come with a murder mystery about sisters on a reality TV show that I could conceivably see appearing on Bravo. But I was not expecting so much. More. Than that! Along with the sibling rivalry, frenemies, and secrets is a message about women’s roles and expectations. Don’t get me wrong—this is chock-full of zingers and Real Housewives-worthy characters. But between that and the shocking murder mystery twists, this book kept me thinking about much more than whodunit.

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The Last

The Last

by Hanna Jameson

Sienna’s Pick #1

Dystopian fiction lovers, this one is for you! Picture it, Jon gets a text message from his wife and ignores it, thinking he can always get back to her later. He’s at a conference in Switzerland and staying at a remote hotel that has a tainted history of suicides and murders. Nuclear war strikes, and Jon finds himself holed up in the hotel with a bunch of strangers, unable to get in touch with his wife and family, or the outside world. Things get even more bizarre when a young girl is found dead in one of the hotel’s water towers, and Jon tries to piece together the mystery of who could have killed her and why. This book will leave you shook and answering every single text from your loved ones because you never know when it could be the last.

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Normal People

Normal People

by Sally Rooney

Sienna’s Pick #2

Everyone’s talking about the second book from rising literary super star Sally Rooney, the author of critically acclaimed Conversations with Friends. Rooney’s often described as the Lena Dunham of Ireland because of her ability to insightfully capture the dialogue and experiences of twenty-somethings. Normal People tells a coming-of-age story with intersecting themes of class and gender. Two Irish teenagers, Connell and Marianne, meet at school and develop an unlikely friendship because Connell’s mother works as a domestic at Marianne’s mansion. The novel follows the trajectory of their relationship from high school to their life at Trinity College. Their social dynamics ultimately change when the formerly friendless Marianne forms friendships with the well-off students, while Connell finds that his childhood popularity doesn’t follow him into this new, privileged world.

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