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Not Ready to Leave Schitt’s Creek? Read These 8 Novels

by  | February 18

All good things must come to an end…but boy, does watching the final season of Schitt’s Creek sting just a little bit, huh? We all love Dan Levy’s brainchild—the perfect maelstrom of family absurdity, small town politics, heartfelt romance, fish-out-of-water narratives, and absolutely batschitt neighbors. It may be out of production now, but it’s never going to be out of our hearts. 

Here are some books to help you fill that strange, quirky little void once the series finale airs this spring.

Rutting Season

Rutting Season

by Mandeliene Smith

Filling the need for quirky, off-the-wall dialogue, Rutting Season takes you back to the first few seasons of Schitt’s Creek. People are angry, upset, familiar, distant, and in love, all in turn. This collection of short stories is Americana to the core, contradictory and fascinating. If you’re into thirty-minute stories full of comedy and drama, this is the collection for you.

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Going Dutch

Going Dutch

by James Gregor

If you, like me, fell in love with the romantic subplots involving David Rose, his ownership of his identity, and his ultimate happy ending, Going Dutch is exactly where you need to be. This book is an especially perfect match with David’s push-pull, will-they, won’t-they companionship with Stevie in the show. Taking on friendship, love, intimacy, and what it means to be queer, lonely, alone, or in a relationship, this book really gets to the heart of what it’s like to have someone to lean on.

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The Family Fang

The Family Fang

by Kevin Wilson

A darkly comic, strangely bizarre book, The Family Fang is about a couple of performance artists (Moira vibes all over this one) who decided that having kids would be the best art experience of all. It’s too bad that the kids didn’t really have much of a say in it. Diving into quirky, rich, elitist families who are too full of themselves to realize the harm they’ve caused, this book portrays the weird and wonderful ways that siblings bond over—and break up with— their past.

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Lie With Me

Lie With Me

by Philippe Besson

If you, like me, enjoy crying uncontrollably about LGBTQ love stories as a form of both catharsis and community, along with experiencing implicitly the joy, heartbreak, and sadness that queer people go through...this is the book you need to read next. I imagine that this is absolutely in David’s TBR, and that he will gift it to his fiancé, Patrick, afterward, with the caveat “I want you to read this. I just don’t want to see you read it, because then I’ll want to read it again.”

(BRB; there’s a fanfic here and I must write it.)

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When We Were Vikings

When We Were Vikings

by Andrew David MacDonald

Strapped-for-cash siblings join forces to survive in a world that wants nothing more than to minimize their existence. Zelda, who reminds me a bit of Alexis Rose, is the ultimate heroine, giving us ferocity and uncompromising rules for respecting her and her space. This is a perfect read for when you want that Alexis-owns-the-world vibe without having to get up at 5 a.m. for her morning run.

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The Vacationers

The Vacationers

by Emma Straub

Let’s say that Schitt’s Creek takes place over two weeks, on an isolated island, where you’re surrounded by your best frenemies and the closest members of your estranged family. Mix all that together, shake well, and you get The Vacationers. With punchy drama and steamy affairs, this book is a wonderfully lighthearted (but still memorable!) read that will absolutely scratch your itch for reading about the ridiculous nouveau riche.

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The Majesties

The Majesties

by Tiffany Tsao

This novel is a sweeping family drama distilled into a single crystalized moment. While the heroine, Gwendolyn, is in a coma for most of the book, her subconscious goes over the events that led up to her sister’s decision to poison their entire family. The affluent and elite world of the uber-rich Southeast Asian family feels somehow both completely relatable and distant, like we’re watching a sitcom with only half the episodes available to stream.

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Maurice

Maurice

by E.M. Forster

One of the OG (Original Gay) novels, Maurice is a deeply passionate, sentimental look at a gay man’s experience of love and loss throughout his life. He’s privileged, rich, and terrible at judging potential boyfriends (sound like anyone you know?). Written almost 100 years ago and first published posthumously 50 years ago, Maurice is a revelation, and an absolutely sob-worthy drama of gay love and family ties.

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Photo Credit // Pop TV

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