search-icon

Our January Picks from Our Fave Celeb Book Clubs

by  | January 28

I can’t help but admire the way that these celeb bookworms have taken advantage of the platforms they have to promote well-written books with female-centered characters, as well as strong literary themes.

But you don’t have to search the web for Emma Watson or Reese Witherspoon’s monthly pick, as we have compiled a short and sweet list for you. Check out the latest recommendations from these and other leading ladies we love, and get reading!

The Library Book

The Library Book

by Susan Orlean

Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick:

In 1986, the Los Angeles Public Library burned down. Four hundred thousand books were consumed in the flames, but no one ever knew the cause of the fire. That’s where Susan Orlean comes in. With her experience as a New Yorker reporter and her skills as a New York Times bestselling author, Susan Orlean delves into this mystery as well as explores the role of libraries in our world, both past and present. She shows us how these beloved institutions have provided us with more than just books in this incredible nonfiction pick.

Amazon logoBarnes & Noble logoBooks a Million logoIndiebound logoSimon & Shuster logo
The Dreamers

The Dreamers

by Karen Thompson Walker

Emma Roberts’s Belletrist Pick:

In an isolated college town located in the hills of Southern California, people begin to drop like flies, fast asleep and unable to be roused. Paramedics and doctors don’t know what to do with this strange and sudden mass breakout of permanent sleep, especially as it begins to spread. Before long, the entire town is turned upside down as people are consumed by pandemic fears and forced quarantines. The novel focuses on a diverse group of characters and the many ways they deal with the sudden outbreak of this mysterious sleeping virus.

Amazon logoBarnes & Noble logoBooks a Million logoIndiebound logo
The Astonishing Color of After

The Astonishing Color of After

by Emily X.R. Pan

Belletrist's YA Pick:

Leigh Chen Sanders knows for a fact that when her mother committed suicide, she turned into a bird. When Leigh, who is half Asian and half white, travels to Taiwan to spend time with her maternal grandparents, she is determined to find her mother, the bird. As Leigh chases after ghosts, she also begins to form a new relationship with her grandparents, as well as to uncover her family secrets. Moving between the past and the present, and infused with magical realism, Leigh discovers who she is in the midst of grief and love.

Amazon logoBarnes & Noble logoBooks a Million logoIndiebound logo
The Things I Would Tell You

The Things I Would Tell You

by Sabrina Mahfouz (Editor)

Emma Watson’s Our Shared Shelf Pick:

What does it mean to be Muslim and British and a woman? In this powerful collection, amazing writers break open the narrow understanding of “Muslim Woman,” by tackling the underlying societal prejudice and fear of minorities they experience. You will encounter short stories, poetry, and nonfiction, as well as writing developed for the theatrical stage. Having gathered various voices, from literary heavyweights to never-before-published spoken word artists, Sabrina Mahfouz creates a safe space for expression. Indeed, these writers feel free to tackle identity, gender, tradition, and changing cultural expectations.

Amazon logoBarnes & Noble logoBooks a Million logoIndiebound logo
Love to get lit... erary? Sign up to get the latest delivered to your inbox!
Estefania Acquaviva is currently an MFA-Fiction student at Columbia University. She recently graduated from Villanova University with a bachelor’s degree in English and Spanish Literature, with minors in Creative Writing and Business. Although she was born in Quito, Ecuador, she moved to the United States when she was in second grade. Away from her home country, she began to write stories to blend her Spanish and English lingo. Though she left Ecuador at a relatively early age, she never stopped loving the culture of her roots. The more she read, the more she wanted to share her own writing, book reviews, and book suggestions. You can find more of her work at www.estefania-acquaviva.com.